Writing

Why The Matrix Is Still My Favorite Science Fiction Movie

You can usually tell if a writer is a fan of The Matrix trilogy of movies.

They’ll start talking about the Red Pill and the Blue Pill.

Slip in references about The Oracle, machines, and ah yes, agents. As in, Agent Smith. And something about a giant big machine that houses a simulated reality.

In other words, The Matrix is real folks, and it’s here to stay! And for me, of course, it remains the best movie ever.

I’m sure there will be plenty of other great movies made, and there have been, but there’s still an inescapable enchantment wrought by the Wachowski Brothers’ bold and mind-stirring action-adventure blockbuster.

hit me

Morpheus: What are you waiting for? You’re faster than this. Don’t think you are, know you are. Come on. Stop trying to hit me and hit me.

Morpheus – there have been few characters in all of Hollywood, period, that capture the imagination in the same way as Morpheus. The role was written to near perfection, and played superbly by Lawrence Fishburne. Perhaps only Heath Ledger’s The Joker and Javier Bardem’s Silva are in the conversation.

The Matrix Reloaded

Are We In A Movie Or Have We Tumbled Down The Rabbit-Hole?

Morpheus: Unfortunately, no one can be told what the Matrix is. You have to see it for yourself.

Morpheus: The Matrix is a system, Neo. That system is our enemy. But when you’re inside, you look around, what do you see? Businessmen, teachers, lawyers, carpenters. The very minds of the people we are trying to save. But until we do, these people are still a part of that system and that makes them our enemy. You have to understand, most of these people are not ready to be unplugged. And many of them are so inured, so hopelessly dependent on the system, that they will fight to protect it.
[Neo’s eyes suddenly wander towards a woman in a red dress]
Morpheus: Were you listening to me, Neo? Or were you looking at the woman in the red dress?
Neo: I was…

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The Matrix
Morpheus: [gestures with one hand] Look again.
[the woman in the red dress is now Agent Smith, pointing a gun at Neo’s head; Neo ducks]
Morpheus: Freeze it.
[Everybody and everything besides Neo and Morpheus freezes in time]
Neo: This… this isn’t the Matrix?
Morpheus: No. It is another training program designed to teach you one thing: if you are not one of us, you are one of them.

Morpheus: Throughout human history, we have been dependent on machines to survive. Fate, it seems, is not without a sense of irony.

So, The Matrix is a real mind-trip, with standout dialog, exotic escapades and the characters to back it up.

rock n roll the Matrix

Why Mr. Anderson? Why?

Agent Smith is one of the best villains ever concocted in Hollywood. He’s at once lethal, calculating and intensely cerebral, always trying to understand why the humans, Neo included, act the way they do.

His curiosity, of course, a subconscious strategy to gain more knowledge and hence more power and advantage, proves his undoing in the end.

He keeps replicating himself in The Matrix. At the same time, he is curious about why Neo even thinks it’s worth fighting on anymore.

The answer of course, when he does find out, is one he’s not gonna like.

Should have known better.

the matrix science fiction movie

If you look past the thrilling action and non-stop battles with the machines, many great ideas emerge out of The Matrix movies.

Not least of all is the dangers modern society faces as our relentless pursuit of technology continues to outpace our capacity as a species to be kind to the rest of Mankind.

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Perhaps, the movies imply, once we get advanced enough, our machines will just end up taking over the entire planet and drive humanity, as a whole, under.

Either way, it’s a good idea to emerge out of the intellectual mind-box and begin to see things as they really are. What they sell us on the soapboxes is not what it really is.

Morpheus: Welcome to the real world.

One Comment

  1. We still have the problem of integrating our culture with technology without destroying the planet. Part of that is we do not have a large enough percentage of the population that comprehends technology. So we have Planned Obsolescence and call it economic growth.

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